A Mom’s Tips for a Successful Clothing Drive Fundraiser

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By Cindy Ann, Schoola Graphic Designer & Mom

When it comes to creative ideas for how to fundraise for my daughter’s school, doing a Schoola clothing drive was a no-brainer. It was super accessible for everyone in our community, and gave a everyone a chance to contribute and get involved!

Here are 5 things I learned:

  1. Leverage Schoola fundraising coaches as a resource: I worked with Tim to set the date for our drive, get custom flyers, and schedule a pickup for our donations. He was able to give recommendations for the duration (one week) and set expectations.
  1. Make the ask easy. Our elementary school has aggressive fundraising goals, which is awesome, except sometimes it feels like they are always asking for money. So, hosting a fundraiser where we are asking families to clean out their closets instead of their bank accounts was an easy ask. I mean who doesn’t have to clean out their closet from time to time, especially with kiddos who sometimes outgrow clothes even before they are worn? It was an easy way for our whole community to contribute and get involved!

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  1. Timing is everything! A large portion of community of parents “drop and go” in the morning, so they don’t always have the opportunity to see our message board and signs around campus. We timed the clothing drive to be a week after back-to-school night. Hosting the drive the week after back-to-school night worked out perfectly because parents had the opportunity to learn about the drive while they were on campus, seeing exactly where they would need to drop off their donations.

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  1. Get the kids involved. My daughter’s local 4th Grade Girl Scout Troop volunteered to be Clothing Drive Ambassadors. They each wore personalized t-shirts, which made them feel important and we made it fun by asking the girls to make signs and pass out flyers and stickers in the front of the school during our car line drop-off the week of the clothing drive. The girls even decided to collect the bags from parents so they didn’t even have to leave their cars.

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  1. Get the word out. Not only is it important to get the word out, but to get it out in lots of different ways! We comminuted through emails, flyers, posters and word of mouth.
  • Email-newsletter & paper-flyers: We included info about the upcoming clothing drive in our weekly newsletter 3 weeks before  the drive and added it to our school calendar as well as sending home a flyer with every student a week before the drive. Then during the week of the drive all kids went home with another reminder flyer and sticker to place on their donation bags.
  • Posters: This took a little more time but it was an extremely effective way to let folks know about our drive. Our Local Girl Scout Troop made big and colorful posters to hang up all around the school and we made sure they were in all the prominent places where we get foot traffic so parents would see them.
  • Word of mouth and social media: Our Girl Scout Troop was super excited to be doing community service for our school and were amazing advocates. They made sure to ask their friends to clean out their closets to help our school. And we got parents talking about it as they waited in the yard during pick-up and posted about it on our school’s Facebook page.

In the end with all our efforts our school collected a whopping 225 bags of clothes. This was an amazing and easy fundraiser for our school. You can check out our school page and track our progress here. And what are you waiting for? Sign up for a Schoola clothing drive today!

CINDYANN-Biocard (1)

Cindy Ann’s favorite part of school was always art class, from drawing and painting to collaging and gluing (and at times tasting the paste). After winning 1st place in her 3rd grade Art Show there wasn’t a creative art class that she didn’t sign up to take. Now as a mama to Ava Blu, and author of a mother & daughter craft book she knows how important it is to have Art offered in schools. It’s not just about making pretty pictures it’s about getting kids thinking and developing them into creative learners with the ability to seek questions, create their own ideas and make personal connections.

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